World War Journalist, Alastair Borthwick

Alastair Borthwick was born in Ruther Glen in 1913 and was raised in Troon and after that in Glasgow. He attended Glasgow High School but left school at the age of sixteen in 1929 so that he would work on the Glasgow Herald.

At Glasgow Herald, he started by taking down copies from the correspondents that were phoning in and then, later on, was promoted as editor of some of the feature pages. Through his involvement in the editorial section, author Borthwick became involved in the hill climbing and walking scenes that was growing popular among the people in Glasgow during weekends. It helped Borthwick become creative with his articles that featured the working class people that he interacted with during the hill walking scenes.

Alastair’s Career

Alastair Borthwick’s career made a huge stepping stone in 1939 where he got a job with the Daily Mirror located in Fleet Street London. However, the phenomenal man went back to Glasgow within his first year at London because he could hardly fit into the lifestyle there and this time he became a correspondent at BBC radio.

Years later at the beginning of the Second World War, Alastair Borthwick was commissioned as an Intelligence Officer in the fifth Battalion. He was involved throughout the hostilities in Italy, Sicily, Holland, Belgium, North Africa, and Belgium. However, when the hostilities came to an end, he was asked to write a Battalion history which was later published in 1946 under the name ‘Sans Peur, The History of the 5th Battalion, the Sea forth Highlanders’.

At the close of The World War, Alastair Borthwick moved from Glasgow to Jura with his wife Anne whom he had married in 1940. He continued with his journalism career as a broadcaster for BBC and combined this venture with fishing. Before moving back to Glasgow, the couple moved to Islay where Borthwick had offered help to Scotland’s organization contributed to the Festival of Britain in 1951.

The couple later moved to Glasgow wherein the 1960’s he began producing half-hour programs for Grampian TV regarding a vast range of topics and subjects. Later on in the 1970’s, the couple moved to Ayrshire where they settled on one of the many hill farms located in the region. Alastair passed on in the year 2003 at a nursing home in Beith. He is remembered for being a remarkable journalist in the world war era, alongside his two major publications. Go to Amazon and get Alastair’s book.

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